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Delegate Loupassi seeks recount in 336-vote defeat

Jeremy Lazarus | 12/8/2017, 6:06 a.m.
With the GOP clinging to a one-seat majority in the 100-member House of Delegates, Richmond Delegate Manoli Loupassi, a Republican ...

With the GOP clinging to a one-seat majority in the 100-member House of Delegates, Richmond Delegate Manoli Loupassi, a Republican who represents the 68th House District, filed last week for a recount in the district that includes parts of Richmond and Chesterfield and Henrico counties.

The recount is to take place Wednesday, Dec. 20, according to a Dec. 6 order.

Democratic challenger Dawn M. Adams upset Delegate Loupassi, a five-term incumbent, by 336 votes out of the more than 39,000 that were cast in the Nov. 7 election, according to certified vote totals posted by the state Board of Elections.

Three others, all Democrats, also are seeking recounts.

Delegate Loupassi, who had conceded the election to Ms. Adams, described the recount in a statement as way to make sure “everything is in order. … I recognize the outcome may not change, but there’s no harm done in making sure the vote is correct.”

Delegate Loupassi declined to say whether he is using campaign funds to pay for the recount or whether the House Republican Caucus or the state Republican Party would pick up the tab.

While he is entitled to seek a recount because Ms. Adams’ margin of victory was less than 1 percent, he lost by too many votes to qualify for a state-paid recount.

Democrats have requested state-paid recounts in the 28th House District where Joshua Cole lost to Republican Robert “Bob” Thomas Jr. in Stafford County by 82 votes; in the 40th House District in Northern Virginia, where Donte Tanner lost by 106 votes to incumbent Republican Delegate Timothy D. Hugo; and in the 94th House District in Newport News, where Shelly Simonds lost to incumbent Republican Delegate David E. Yancey by 10 votes.

All recounts are expected to be completed later this month.

Unless the recounts change the certified outcomes, Republicans will continue to hold slim majorities in both the House and Senate.

Incoming Gov. Ralph S. Northam, a Democrat, could try to change that situation by naming one or two Republican legislators to cabinet posts or to agency director spots in hopes voters would replace them with Democrats.